George killed Lennie because he felt he had no other choice. When Lennie says "Let's go there now, George" on page 105, George believes he is sending Lennie there, to Lennie's heaven with rabbits and their own place to live off fatta' the land.

Simply because the other options were so much worse. Lennie was a murderer; he didn't do it on purpose but he had killed a woman, he broke her neck. Mine is the Penguin Modern Classics publishing. Why does George kill Lennie? The scene shifts to Sunday afternoon as Lennie sits in the barn, contemplating a dead puppy. Answered by kevin j #461540 4 years ago 9/12/2015 7:12 PM. Why Is George Justified To Kill Lennie Justified 868 Words | 4 Pages. He fears that George will not allow him to tend rabbits and contemplates hiding the dead puppy. It wasn't a police force coming for Lennie, it was a mob. Lennie is gripped by a growing panic that George will find the dead puppy and that now he "won't get to tend the rabbits" (93).. Curley's wife enters in a dress decorated with red ostrich feathers. He does not take responsibility for being too rough with the puppy and begins to worry about George's reaction. In the book there are characters like George and Lennie who are always trying to see the positive side of life and then there are characters like Crooks and Curley who see the negative. We will write a custom essay on Is George right to kill Lennie? Lennie died believing that one-day they would have their own farm, with rabbits and … We're starting to suspect that George doesn't have much sense of justice. He chose to do the deed himself because he loved Lennie. George is a man of morals and when Lennie killed Curley’s wife, he broke the biggest moral law which forced him to kill Lennie: ”You hadda, George” Slim tells George that shooting Lennie was morally the right thing to do and that he should feel honoured, because he did the right thing. George knows that he has to kill Lennie in order to protect him. and Lennie wasnt very smart. “George, you want I should go away and leave you alone.” (Steinbeck 12). Which bring us to this scene. In the novella, Of Mice and Men, by John Steinbeck, George killing Lennie is a merciful kill to save others from Lennie’s unintentional acts of aggression, to spare Lennie from suffering a cruel death, and instead ensuring a peaceful and quick departure one that will cause George the least regrets. He fears that George will not allow him to tend rabbits and contemplates hiding the dead puppy. He knows that Lennie doesn't mean any harm, but the fact is that he does harm: he kills mice; he terrifies women; and he's going to end up killing someone. George can be described as the brains of the partnership, while Lennie is more of the muscle. Lennie’s dependent personality and mental state would make a mental institution a horrible place to spend the rest of his life. In Chapter 5, Lennie accidently kills his puppy by being too rough with it. We have to say it: maybe George shouldn't be protecting Lennie. See Full Answer. He could either attempt to kill him as humanely as possible or allow the other men to beat and hang him with an enormous amount of suffering. I think that Steinbeck focuses deeply on the atmosphere of the last chapter. In Chapter 5, Lennie accidently kills his puppy by being too rough with it. Start studying George Killing Lennie Quotes. Learn vocabulary, terms, and more with flashcards, games, and other study tools. George did not kill Lennie out of spite, not because of his thoughtless, innocent, act had dashed George’s hopes of having a small farm. He has killed his pup by petting it too hard. He is upset at the puppy for dying. I will first say that the page number depends on what copy of the book you have. He does not berate Lennie. and Lennie is capable of killing anyone. What George does not seem to realize is how dangerous Lennie's strength can be, a danger that Steinbeck makes clear when Lennie …