10–1259. See United States v. Jones, 625 F.3d 766 (D.C. Cir.

A summary and case brief of United States v. Jones, 132 S.Ct. SUPREME COURT OF THE UNITED STATES. In United States v. Jones (2012) the U.S. Supreme Court found that attaching a GPS tracker to a private vehicle constituted an illegal search and seizure under the Fourth Amendment of the U.S. Constitution.

Global-Positioning-System (GPS) tracking device on a vehicle regis- See Brief for Petitioner, United States of America at 3. certiorari to the united states court of appeals for the district of columbia circuit. See United States v. Maynard, 615 F.3d 544, 549 (D.C. Cir.

The Court, however, The Fifth Circuit vacated and remanded defendants' convictions under 18 U.S.C. CERTIORARI TO THE UNITED STATES COURT OF APPEALS FOR THE DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA CIRCUIT . 1 In this litigation, the Government has conceded noncompliance with the warrant and has argued only that a warrant was not required.United States v.Maynard, 615 F. 3d 544, 566, n.(CADC 2010). UNITED STATES v. JONES. Circuit denied the United States’ request. The warrant they obtained required it to be executed within 10 days in the District of Columbia. The Government acknowledged, however, that Jones was “the exclusive driver.” Id., at 555, n.

In United States v. Jones (2012) the U.S. Supreme Court found that attaching a GPS tracker to a private vehicle constituted an illegal search and seizure under the Fourth Amendment of the U.S. Constitution. 945 (2012), including the facts, issue, rule of law, holding and reasoning, key terms, and concurrences and dissents. Statement of the Facts: Police suspected Antoine Jones of engaging in drug-related crimes and applied for a warrant to place a global-positioning-system tracking device (GPS) on Jones’s car. No. 2010). United States v. Jones is a Near-Optimal Result, Paul Ohm, Freedom to Tinker, Jan. 23, 2012; Three Questions Raise by the Trespass Test in United States v. Jones, Orin Kerr, The Volokh Conspiracy, Jan. 23, 2012; Opinion Recap: Tight Limit on Police GPS Use (FINAL UPDATE), Lyle Denniston, SCOTUSblog, Jan. 23, 2012 In United States v. Jones, 132 S. Ct. 945 (2012), all nine Supreme Court Justices agreed that Jones was searched when the police attached a Global Positioning System (GPS) device to the undercarriage of his car and tracked his movements for four weeks. Syllabus. Justia Opinion Summary. United States v. Jones Case Brief. As part of the investigation, a federal judge in the District of Columbia approved a warrant authorizing the FBI agents to install a Global Positioning System (“GPS”) tracking device on a Jeep that Jones routinely used. 10–1259. 2010). Respondent Jones was an owner and operator of a nightclub and came under suspicion of narcotics trafficking. UNITED STATES .

945 (2012) Facts. 18-30256 (5th Cir.