Thirty-two Canada Natives who attended the Kamloops Indian Residential School agreed to share their stories in the form of this book. The Kamloops Indian Residential School was part of the Canadian residential school system and one of the 130 schools for First Nations children that operated in Canada between 1874 and 1996. From the testimony of residential school students as told to the Truth and Reconciliation Commission The school was operated by the Roman Catholic Church. Menu . The school has been closed since 1977, but for many who survived their time there, the spiritual and emotional wounds still haven’t healed. In this way, their families and communities could learn and understand what happened at the school, and all Canadians could know the truth about residential schools so that history is never repeated. The Kamloops Indian Residential School is no exception. Real stories about real people in Kamloops and beyond! Behind Closed Doors features written testimonials from thirty-two individuals who attended the Kamloops Indian Residential School. The storytellers remember and share with us their stolen time at the school; many stories are told through courageous tears. The signs share stories of the people, places and events that helped shape B.C.’s history. Survivors of residential schools tell their stories. KAMLOOPS — Beginning in 1893, hundreds of Secwepemc children were forcibly removed from their homes, and taken to the Kamloops Indian Residential School. Hundreds of … The Kamloops School was opened in 1893 (initially as the Kamloops Industrial School) and continued operation until 1977. He describes what life was like attending St. Anne's, in northern Ontario, with … The school was created in 1893 by the Canadian government in cooperation with Roman and Protestant churches to “Christianize and civilizes” the Secwepemc. Contact; For The Kamloops Residents Who Used To ‘Wake Up Beside Peter Olsen’ April 27, 2020 by kamloopscoffeetalk Leave a Comment on For The Kamloops Residents Who Used To ‘Wake Up Beside Peter Olsen’ Red Bridge, Kamloops, BC Peter Olsen is recognized by many as 'The Morning Mayor'. Ron Gosbee isn't Indigenous, but as a child, he attended a residential school. During this stay in Kamloops, I worked with the local Secwepemc (Shuswap) people to produce a new phase of the “Imaging British Columbia” project that focuses on the stories of the Kamloops Indian Residential School. The school was one of many infamous residential schools that operated from 1893 to 1979.